Events & Seminars > Event Details

Where:

4:00 pm
Room 304, Chemistry Building

Scientific Utopia: Improving Openness and Reproducibility In Research

Speaker:

Professor Brian Nosek
Department of Psychology, University of Virginia

Hosted by: Professors Andreas Gahlmann and Rebecca Pompano

The currency of academic science is publishing.  Producing novel, positive, and clean results maximizes the likelihood of publishing success because those are the best kind of results.  There are multiple ways to produce such results: (1) be a genius, (2) be lucky, (3) be patient, or (4) employ flexible analytic and selective reporting practices to manufacture beauty.  In a competitive marketplace with minimal accountability, it is hard to avoid (4).  But, there is a way.  With results, beauty is contingent on what is known about their origin.  With methodology, if it looks beautiful, it is beautiful. The only way to be rewarded for something other than the results is to make transparent how they were obtained.  With openness, I won’t stop aiming for beautiful papers, but when I get them, it will be clear that I earned them.

Brian Nosek received a Ph.D. in from Yale University in 2002 and is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received early career awards from the International Social Cognition Network (ISCON) and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI). He co-founded Project Implicit (http://projectimplicit.net/) an Internet-based multi-university collaboration of research and education about thoughts and feelings that exist outside of awareness or control. Nosek also co-founded and directs the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io/) that aims to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. COS is a non-profit, technology start-up with three primary activities: (1) building and maintaining the Open Science Framework (http://osf.io/) that supports the research workflow and enables transparency, archiving, and pre-registration; (2) building community and shifting incentives such as badges for articles to acknowledge open practices; and, (3) conducting metascience such as estimating the reproducibility of scientific research by conducting large-scale, crowdsourced replication projects.