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Undergraduates Receive Harrison Research Awards

Congratulations to the following chemistry majors who are recipients of Harrison Undergraduate Research Awards.

Kyle Alexander of McLean, a third-year biochemistry major, who is researching mitochondria, which produce cellular energy and maintain cell health, and will examine if the transfer of healthy mitochondria can supplement the function of pre-existing mitochondria in recipient cells.

Julia Graff of Hershey, Pennsylvania, a third-year biochemistry major, who is researching how a protein, Cdt2, interacts with human papilloma virus protein E6 to determine if this interaction is linked to how the human papillomavirus causes cancer.

Ji In Han of Allentown, Pennsylvania, a third-year biochemistry major, who is researching how to streamline a method for finding amino acid residues on two interacting proteins that won’t interfere with their binding. This work could help prevent the spread of cancer cells.

Alina Nguyen of Mechanicsville, a third-year biochemistry major, who is investigating DNA damage-signaling pathways in working with diseases such as autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, early onset Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy.

Thomas Parks Remcho of Corvallis, Oregon, a third-year biochemistry and neuroscience major, who is researching the role of signaling proteins in the nerves within adipose tissue and how these signals impact metabolic function and coordinate fat tissue loss during a diet.

Miyabi (May) Saito of Vienna, a third-year biochemistry major, who is researching mechanisms of specific receptors in inhibiting growth of ovarian cancer cells.

Rose Sleppy of Atlanta, a third-year biochemistry major, who is researching prostate cancer biology.

Ethan Steen of Essex, Massachusetts, a third-year biochemistry major, and Barat Venkataramany of Ashland, Ohio, a second-year biochemistry major, who are studying the interactions of serum albumins with a variety of drugs across a variety of mammalian species, in an effort to create a data bank to further the understanding of animal models.

Benjamin Scott Winter of Little Rock, Arkansas, a third-year biochemistry and neuroscience major, who is researching neurons and the transport protein dynein, which carries various other cargos throughout the cell and is believed is play a major role in guiding neurons’ growth, in an effort to understand how organisms develop and possibly to repair damaged neural networks.

More information on this can be found here.